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San Bernardino Sun, Joe Nelson www.sbsun.com/environment-and-nature/20140502/controversial-pipeline-project-surges-forward Orange County Superior Court Judge Gail Andler’s ruling Thursday dismissed each of six complaints filed against the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project, according to a news release and attached court order. The project would divert surplus groundwater from the Fenner Valley, about 40 miles northeast of Twentynine Palms and south of the Mojave National Preserve, to the Colorado River Aqueduct. The groundwater would then be sold to other water agencies for municipal and industrial use. The plan proposes pumping 50,000 to 75,000 acre-feet of groundwater a year from the aquifer during the project’s 50-year projected lifespan.

Court Upholds Environmental Impact Report Supporting Project Approvals May 2, 2014 - LOS ANGELES, CA – Today Cadiz Inc. [NASDAQ:CDZI] (“Cadiz”, the “Company”) announced the issuance of the trial court decision to uphold the environmental approvals of the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project (“Cadiz...

Agencies Gamble on Need and Price Santa Barbara Independent, By Nick Welsh March 26, 2014 About two weeks ago, three South Coast water agencies — desperate to augment supplies in the face of a withering drought — combined forces to place a bid on surplus State Water from purveyors...

Water recovery project could ease drought. ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER March 10, 2014 Despite the recent heavy rain, California’s water situation remains dire. Data from the U.S. Drought Monitor, a partnership between the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the...

Major water supply benefits realized by all Southern California water users not only project subscribers January 29, 2014 - Today, Cadiz Inc. made available a new report prepared by Southern California economic consulting firm Stratecon Inc. that describes up to $6.1 Billion in benefits that can be realized by Southern California...

Dismissal by Laborers International Union Follows Completion of New Independent Hydrology Report (Los Angeles, CA) -- Cadiz Inc. [NASDAQ:CDZI] (“Cadiz”, the “Company”) reported today that a lawsuit filed in 2012 challenging the environmental approvals of the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project (“Project”)  has been dismissed with prejudice in Orange County, California Superior Court.  The lawsuit, filed against the Company, the Santa Margarita Water District (“SMWD”) and the County of San Bernardino (“County”), is the third case challenging Project approval to be dismissed. Only two challengers now remain. This latest dismissal follows the completion of a new independent peer review of the Project’s hydrology, which responds to previous hydrologic criticisms of the Project and confirms that the Project can safely deliver a reliable water supply to Southern California.

October 2, 2013 - Today the Company made available a new report by GHA Water Inc. finding that the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project (Cadiz Project) offers $648 million in additional benefits to the Southern California water system, if the Project qualifies as Intentionally Created Surplus (ICS) under Colorado River supply management guidelines adopted in 2007 by the US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation).

http://www.flashreport.org/blog/2013/09/30/buried-treasure-in-the-mojave-water/ Flashreport.org, guest post by Laer Pearce Sep 30, 2013 One would think that if a huge underground lake existed less than 100 miles from Southern California water users who live continually on the edge of a water supply crisis, there would be a rush to get that water into Southern California's water system. One would also think, since this is California, that an extraordinarily challenging level of environmental review would be required before a single drop of that water could head toward users, and that a round of lawsuits would challenge the environmental review's conclusions.