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By Scott Slater Published in the San Bernardino Sun October 8, 2012 From the time before statehood, water has been recognized as the lifeblood of California's economy. A little more than 80 years ago, the people of this state adopted a constitutional amendment mandating the optimization of efficient water use in California. Since that time, water has remained a critical resource and Article 10, Section 2 of the California Constitution has served to provide the legal and policy underpinnings for responsible water use.

OC Register http://www.ocregister.com/opinion/private-360853-water-project.html By JOHN A. BOHN The media repeatedly tells us that California has major problems - an unbalanced budget, a stagnant economy, a depressed housing market, and an unreliable water supply. Yet, the state is home to the world's ninth-largest economy and, with a progressive culture of hope and promise, remains an attractive place to live and work. California's success is dependent on reliable infrastructure and the availability of water. The state cannot ignore failing water infrastructure or avoid making investments that can provide transcendent benefits for the economy and future generations.

By Scott Slater Published in the SBC Sentinel May 25, 2012 Cadiz, California is an eastern Mojave Desert railroad stop hidden along historic Route 66, crisscrossed by the BNSF and Arizona and California (ARZC) railroads. Traveling through this part of California, you may have noticed the splashes of green vineyards and lemon orchards that line the desert horizon. Cadiz Inc., a California public company, operates a 1,600 acre farm here. The Company is the largest private landowner in the area, with a total of 34,000 acres (50 square miles) in Cadiz and 11,000 additional acres in other parts of the Mojave.

By Winston H. Hickox Sacramento Bee Winston H. Hickox, former secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency,  is a principal with the consulting firm California Strategies. He is responding to the April 13 Viewpoints article, "Plan to tap groundwater for profit shows need for better state policy." That article stated: "The bottom line is that the project relies on unsustainable mining of groundwater, designed to extract groundwater at a rate exceeding natural recharge."

By Scott Slater March 29, 2012 The following provides an overview of the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project and offers a response to questions recently voiced in the online community about the science behind the Project.  The Project is a Southern California water conservation project that would capture and conserve groundwater to provide a new, reliable water supply for approximately 200,000 individuals across the region per year.

February 10, 2012 Today Santa Margarita Water District (SMWD), the Lead Agency for the proposed Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project (“Project”), announced that it has extended the public comment period for the Project’s Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR)  an additional 30 days. The comment period will now conclude on March 14, 2012.

By Terry Foreman, PG, C.Hg., and Dennis Williams, Ph.D, PG., C.Hg. January 31, 2012 The innovative Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project would enable water to be beneficially used in California by capturing water that is currently being lost to evaporation in the Mojave Desert.  The Project is currently undergoing a public review under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).  As with any public process, opponents are entitled and encouraged to question CEQA documents and challenge a project's design or assumptions.  However, many of the most vocal critics of the Cadiz Project have never visited the project area or reviewed any studies and rely instead on misinformation and assumptions that are simply incorrect, untrue and wrong.

For the past several years the state of California has worked to ensure that water supplies are available to meet demand. This effort has been complex and complicated by drought as well as systematic restrictions on all of the state's primary water supplies. During my time as the secretary of California's Environmental Protection Agency, I worked hard to implement environmentally sound policies to address many of California's most pressing environmental challenges, including water supply. While conservation has been crucial in helping to curb growth in water demand, most water policy experts agree that reducing demand alone will not be enough to meet the California's future water needs. We need new supplies.

Nearly 200 attend fundraiser in Cadiz, raising $4,160 for observatory project

By Kelly O'Sullivan,  The Desert Trail Published: Wednesday, May 4, 2011 Cadiz, CA -- Dylan Wood couldn’t wait to see the surface of the sun. The West Hills 4-year-old fidgeted quietly while his brother, Auden, 8, looked through a telescope set up by amateur astronomers Saturday, April 30 at Cadiz Ranch east of Amboy. When the older boy was finished, his eager brother scrambled up a small step ladder and fixed his eye to the lens. “I saw a big red dot,” he exclaimed, smiling from ear to ear, adding proudly, “I’m almost 5.”