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Major water supply benefits realized by all Southern California water users not only project subscribers January 29, 2014 - Today, Cadiz Inc. made available a new report prepared by Southern California economic consulting firm Stratecon Inc. that describes up to $6.1 Billion in benefits that can be realized by Southern California...

October 2, 2013 - Today the Company made available a new report by GHA Water Inc. finding that the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project (Cadiz Project) offers $648 million in additional benefits to the Southern California water system, if the Project qualifies as Intentionally Created Surplus (ICS) under Colorado River supply management guidelines adopted in 2007 by the US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation).

Today, a long-awaited draft maximum contaminant level (MCL) for Chromium-6 was proposed by the California Department of Public Health at 10 (ten) parts per billion (ppb). Chromium-6 is a groundwater constituent found in over 30% of groundwater basins in California, including Riverside County’s Coachella Valley and various basins in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Solano, Santa Barbara, San Mateo, Santa Cruz and Yolo Counties. For example, affected cities include Glendale, Burbank, North Hollywood, Pomona, Monterey, Chino, Joshua Basin, Phelan, Twentynine Palms, Solano, Daly City, Santa Ynez, Soquel Creek, Davis, Woodland, and parts of San Francisco.   It also naturally occurs in the Cadiz Valley aquifer system at levels consistent with the proposed MCL.

The Cadiz Project, which will serve the water needs of 100,000 Southern California families and generate 5,900 jobs, has been fully reviewed and approved under the California Environmental Quality Act, the most stringent environmental law in America. The Project includes strong monitoring and enforcement to ensure that it is safe and sustainable and offers many local benefits, including significant investment in the local economy and certainty that water will be available for Southern California.

By Scott Slater Published in the San Bernardino Sun October 8, 2012 From the time before statehood, water has been recognized as the lifeblood of California's economy. A little more than 80 years ago, the people of this state adopted a constitutional amendment mandating the optimization of efficient water use in California. Since that time, water has remained a critical resource and Article 10, Section 2 of the California Constitution has served to provide the legal and policy underpinnings for responsible water use.

OC Register http://www.ocregister.com/opinion/private-360853-water-project.html By JOHN A. BOHN The media repeatedly tells us that California has major problems - an unbalanced budget, a stagnant economy, a depressed housing market, and an unreliable water supply. Yet, the state is home to the world's ninth-largest economy and, with a progressive culture of hope and promise, remains an attractive place to live and work. California's success is dependent on reliable infrastructure and the availability of water. The state cannot ignore failing water infrastructure or avoid making investments that can provide transcendent benefits for the economy and future generations.

By Scott Slater Published in the SBC Sentinel May 25, 2012 Cadiz, California is an eastern Mojave Desert railroad stop hidden along historic Route 66, crisscrossed by the BNSF and Arizona and California (ARZC) railroads. Traveling through this part of California, you may have noticed the splashes of green vineyards and lemon orchards that line the desert horizon. Cadiz Inc., a California public company, operates a 1,600 acre farm here. The Company is the largest private landowner in the area, with a total of 34,000 acres (50 square miles) in Cadiz and 11,000 additional acres in other parts of the Mojave.